WARNING: Do not cite this page as a reference. This page is on this wikispace only to make the content "searchable" and easier to find. If you find the information you seek here, go to the original sources as linked below to verify the information and use them for your documentation.

Revised Nov 11, 2013 9:47 am.

Period Forms:



Sources:

Academy of St. Gabriel "Medieval Names Archive" - http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/
Database of medieval names (from the Medieval Names Archive) - http://www.ellipsis.cx/~liana/names/database/
Archive of St. Gabriel reports - http://www.panix.com/~gabriel/public-bin/archive.cgi

Laurel Name Articles - http://heraldry.sca.org/laurel/

IGI Searches, batches beginning with C, J, K, M (except M17 and M18), or P are acceptable - https://familysearch.org/search/collection/igi

Omniglot On-line Encyclopedia of Writing Systems and Languages - http://www.omniglot.com/index.htm



Precedents:

Precedents of the SCA College of Arms - http://heraldry.sca.org/laurel/precedents.html
Morsulus Heralds Website - http://www.morsulus.org/ (to search the LoARs and Precedents)
Restatement Wiki - http://yehudaheraldry.com/restatement/index.php?title=Main_Page (restatements of Precedents)
Use the above links to be sure any precedents listed below haven't been superseded by newer precedents.

From the June 2011 LoAR:

Cassandra Attewoode. Household name Summers Keep..
Current precedent says that Keep and its Middle English form Kepe are registerable in contexts that surnames would apply, but not as placename elements (see the November 2001 and May 2011 LoARs for more details).
However, for this submission, commenters were able to find evidence of the use of Kepe in placenames. Studies on Middle English local surnames by Mattias Teodor Löfvenberg dates le Kepe as a placename to 1425 (along with Kepeland 1204 and Kepe mede 1530).
Therefore we can overturn the precedent; Kepe is found both as a standalone placename and as a protheme (first element) in English placenames and can be used as such. It is not clear that the element here is in fact the word meaning "castle," as that word is not attested in locations other than placenames and surnames before the 16th century. But it is registerable in contexts where a placename can be registered. This does not allow the registration of Keep as a deuterotheme (second element) in placenames; it remains unattested and will not be allowed without further evidence.
As one pattern for compound placenames is the addition of a family name in the possessive form before an existing placename, Middle English Summers Kepe or Early Modern English Summers Keep can be justified as a plausible placename.
The next question is whether Keep can be a designator, or whether this must be registered as something like Summers Keep House. We are willing to give the submitter the benefit of the doubt that the element Keep found in bynames and placenames is a word meaning something like "castle." As words like Castle can be registered either as designators or as substantive elements within a household name, we can register this as submitted.
http://heraldry.sca.org/loar/2011/06/11-06lar.html

From Pelican: No More SCA-Compatibility

On the May 2008 Cover Letter, we ruled:
  • Therefore, as of the May 2009 decisions meetings, we declare that no new name elements or name patterns will be ruled SCA-compatible, that all names previously ruled SCA-compatible are no longer SCA-compatible and that in order for them to be registered, documentation meeting the same standards as for non-SCA-compatible names will be required.
This ruling went into effect with this, the May 2009 Pelican meeting.
http://heraldry.sca.org/loar/2009/05/09-05cl.html


Compiled Name Precedents:

http://heraldry.sca.org/laurel/precedents/CompiledNamePrecedents/Compatible.html
François la Flamme
2002.07
The submitter requested authenticity for 12th C English. The byname Ravenskeep was undocumented in the LoI except for noting its registration as a household name, which the submitter cannot claim under the Grandfather Clause. The element -keep was upheld as SCA compatible in the LoAR of November 2001:

  • Keep has long been used as part of SCA branch names. The most recent registration is Crossrode Keep, Shire of (registered November 1999 via Ansteorra). This element is effectively regarded as SCA compatible as an element in an English place name. Given the forms in which it has been registered, spellings of the element Keep are registerable both as a separate element (such as Crossrode Keep), and as the final element in a compound place name (such as Northkeep). [Tristan Ravencrest, Æthelmearc-A, LoAR 11/2001]
The College found evidence of English placenames that include Ravens- as a protheme, making Ravenkeep a registerable placename, with one weirdness for use of an SCA compatible element (-keep). [Michael of Ravenskeep, 07/2002, A-Outlands]
François la Flamme
2001.11
[crest and keep] The element crest falls into the same category as keep. In both cases, we do not have evidence of that element used in a formal place name in period, though we have evidence of each as a geographical element. Bardsley (p. 216 s.n. Crest) dates both Rogerus del Crest and Johannes del Crest to 1379. Bardsley (p. 441 s.n. Keep) dates William atte Kep to 18 Edw. I, Roger Kep to I Edw. III, and Richard atte Kippe to I Edw. III. Reaney & Wilson (p. 261 s.n. Keep) dates Thomas ate Kepe to 1327 and Roger de Kepe to 1332.

Keep has long been used as part of SCA branch names. The most recent registration is Crossrode Keep, Shire of (registered November 1999 via Ansteorra). This element is effectively regarded as SCA compatible as an element in an English place name. Given the forms in which it has been registered, spellings of the element Keep are registerable both as a separate element (such as Crossrode Keep), and as the final element in a compound place name (such as Northkeep). Registerable spellings include Keep and any alternate spellings which may be documented to period (including those listed above).

Similarly, there has been enough interest in the element crest, including as recently as 1999, to rule it SCA compatible in an English place name. Unlike keep, crest is not registerable as a separate element. So, Ravencrest is a registerable placename, though Ravenwood Crest, for example, is not. [Tristan Ravencrest, 11/01, A-Æthelmearc]
Jaelle of Armida
1997.07
[registering Sylvana Evelune de Aneslea] Submitted as Sylvana Evangeline of Ansley Keep, [...] There is no evidence for keep in period place­names; we have changed the place name to the closest period form. (Jaelle of Armida, LoAR July 1997, p. 7)