WARNING: Do not cite this page as a reference. This page is on this wikispace only to make the content "searchable" and easier to find. If you find the information you seek here, go to the original sources to verify the information and use them for your documentation.

One may be tempted to use the Blazon Pattern Search Form for conflict checking, but then you get bogged down in searching for all the possible variations of a charge and the charges that might conflict with it - eagle vs. eagles vs. falcon/s vs. owl/s displayed, etc. It's time consuming and, somehow, you always miss something.

It is best to go to the Index of the Ordinary where charges are grouped into categories of related and possibly (albeit not always) conflicting charges. There are usually a lot of charges to look through, but they are organized by blazon and you can use "Control + F" to search for key words on the web page.

If you don't know what category something would be in, go to the "blazon pattern search form". Enable the armory description (under Display Options) and then search for what you need. That will show you the category.

You need to be familiar with:
SENA PN.3. Personal Names Conflict - http://heraldry.sca.org/sena.html#PN3
SENA NPN.3. Non-Personal Names Conflict - http://heraldry.sca.org/sena.html#NPN3
SENA A.5. Armory Conflict - http://heraldry.sca.org/sena.html#A5
Appendix M: Some Resources for Conflict Checking - http://heraldry.sca.org/sena.html#AppendixM

Articles on Conflict Checking:

http://www.modaruniversity.org/Heraldry2.htm#Conflict (many are based on the old rules, but the basic principles are sound)

"Conflict Checking 101: Theory" -
http://www.tanzos.net/~victoria/HeraldicEducation/Intro%20to%20Conflict%20Checking.pdf

"How do you conflict-check a device?" at http://lochac.sca.org/herald/checking

East Kingdom video classes and handouts: http://elmet.eastkingdom.org/ekhu/ (includes 4 sessions related to conflict checking).

Complex Search Form


  • Codes from the Ordinary to use in the Complex Search Form - http://oanda.sca.org/my.cat
    • It can help to change the dropdown box next to "Armory descriptions" to "Enabled". This will show you EVERY category for each device that comes up. For example:
      • Antonia Leonora Dragonsrun de Beaumont
        The following badge associated with this name was registered in November of 2011 (via Caid):
        Azure bezanty, a pale urdy Or.
        Armory descriptions:
        AZ
        FIELD TREATMENT-SEME (ROUNDELS):or
        FIELD:azure
        PALE:1:or:spna:unc:urdy
        ROUNDEL:or:pl:seme:seme on field:unc
  • Blazon parsing script to help convert heraldic blazon into complex search form terms to ease the process of conflict-checking (work in progress by Kihou) - http://xavid.us/blazon/

  • The magic word for searching for overall charges in the complex search form is "debruising"
  • spa - "single primary alone"
  • spna - "single primary not alone"


SENA Appendix M: Some Resources for Conflict Checking

http://heraldry.sca.org/sena.html#AppendixM

Some notes about conflict and types of charges:
In general, two charges that were considered independent charges in period will have at least a distinct change. Charges that were used interchangeably are considered not to have a distinct change for type.

For the most part, the Ordinary lists types of charges that conflict in a single category.

We do not distinguish among types of canines/lupines, because creatures like wolves and foxes or wolves and dogs were often distinguished in period armory based on the cant of the owners name (so Woulf would have a wolf, while Vuhs would have a fox). The variety of kinds of canines we register also makes it difficult to draw lines between types of dogs.

We do not distinguish among most types of fish for similar reasons.

We do not distinguish among various types of cats because the animals are normally drawn very similarly.

Birds, on the other hand, can be substantially different. Birds fall into four categories:
  • "regular-shaped" birds (like martlets, ravens, eagles, falcons)
  • swan-shaped birds (like swans, geese, and ducks)
  • poultry-shaped birds (like chickens, quail, and peacocks)
  • crane-shaped birds (like cranes, herons, and storks)
Birds in a different category can be substantially different in type if they are in two different groups and are in a period posture for that sort of bird (see http://heraldry.sca.org/loar/2003/11/03-11brd.html for the list). So, Sable, a duck close argent and Sable, a stork close argent are clear; both are also clear of Sable, a falcon close argent.

Dragons and wyverns were considered artistic variants of the same beast in period armory. Therefore, there is not a DC between them.

Suns, mullets, and estoiles are all in conflict when they have a large number of points (seven or more). There is a DC between them and a default mullet (of five points) or estoile (of six points).

Trees are divided into two categories: regular or round shaped, and fir or pine tree shaped. There is a DC between the two types, when the type is specified. There is not a DC for blasting or eradicating a tree.

[See also Cross for precedents about conflicts in this important category of charges.]

Complex lines of division that conflict:

Broadly, complex lines of division fall into several groups. In general, there is a DC between variants that belong to different groups. There is in general a DC between any two lines in the "jagged" group; as research has proved that these lines were common and were considered distinct by period heralds unlike the situation for the "square" group and the "wavy" group. In addition, there is in general a DC between any two lines in the "other" group, as it is a catch-all with no relationship between them. Those listed as "variants of straight line" also conflict with a straight line.
  • Straight line variants: plain, ployé, enarched,
  • Square: embattled, dovetailed, bretessed, embattled counterembattled, raguly, denticulada
  • Wavy: Wavy, nebuly, urdy
  • Long: Rayonny
  • Jagged: indented, engrailed, invected, dancetty, lozengy
  • Other: bevilled, potenty, flory-counterflory, indented fleury at the points, left step/right step, rompu, triangular
http://heraldry.sca.org/sena.html#AppendixM

SENA Appendix L: A Partial List of Postures and Orientations

http://heraldry.sca.org/sena.html#AppendixL

This is a list of postures and orientations that can be used to determine whether two charges or groups of charges conflict or whether there is a distinct change for posture/orientation.
Animate Charges
A. Quadrupeds: The postures listed within each group generally conflict, though a distinct change may be given for facing to dexter or to sinister.
  • rampant, segreant, salient, sejant erect, statant erect
  • passant, statant, courant
  • sejant, sejant erect
  • couchant, dormant
  • sejant erect affronty, sejant affronty
B. Birds: The postures listed within each group generally conflict, though a distinct change may be given for facing to dexter or to sinister.
  • close, naiant
  • displayed, migrant
  • volant
  • rousant, rising, striking
C. Insects and Other Tergiant-Default Creatures: This category is for insects and other creatures whose default is tergiant. The postures listed within each group generally conflict.
  • tergiant
  • tergiant inverted
  • bendwise
  • bendwise sinister
D. Fish: The postures listed within each group generally conflict, though a distinct change may be given for facing to dexter or to sinister.
  • haurient, urinant
  • naiant
E: Humanoids: This category is for humans and humanoid monsters. The postures listed within each group generally conflict.
  • statant
  • statant affronty
  • mounted on a horse or other creature
F. Sea creatures and other Erect-Default Creatures: This category is for sea creatures and other creatures whose default is erect. The postures listed within each group generally conflict.
  • erect
G. Other Animate Charges: Animate charges with postures that do not fit into these categories may be classified into one of those categories on a case by case basis, or may be ruled to receive complete change of posture against none of them.

The posture is also changed if the orientation is changed from one of these to another (noting that some of these postures are not allowed for some creatures):
  • head to chief
  • bendwise
  • bendwise inverted
  • bendwise sinister
  • bendwise sinister inverted
  • fesswise
  • fesswise contourny
  • head to base

Inanimate Charges
Inanimate charges are split into two types: compact charges and long charges.

Compact charges of different types do not have a distinct change for orientation changes.
Compact charges that are radially symmetric, like roses, mullets, and suns, do not have a distinct change for orientation changes under any circumstances.
Compact charges with a clear top and bottom may have a distinct change for changes when the two orientations are different and on this list:
  • top to chief
  • bendwise
  • bendwise inverted
  • bendwise sinister
  • bendwise sinister inverted
  • fesswise
  • fesswise reversed
  • top to base

Long charges of different types may have a distinct change for changes that alter the orientation of the long axis of the charge, so
  • palewise (upright or inverted)
  • bendwise (upright or inverted)
  • bendwise sinister (upright or inverted)
  • fesswise (to dexter or reversed)
Long charges of identical types may also receive a DC for facing – the change from dexter facing to sinister facing and from upright to inverted – if they have a clearly defined point or head. There is a DC between a sword palewise and a sword palewise inverted. Long charges may also receive a DC for facing if they have another clearly defined axis, like right and left or up and down. Thus there is a DC between a bow fesswise and a bow fesswise inverted.
http://heraldry.sca.org/sena.html#AppendixL


SENA Appendix K: Standard Arrangements for Charge Groups of Different Number

http://heraldry.sca.org/sena.html#AppendixK

This appendix is a tool to determine if two charge groups of different sizes with different arrangements have comparable arrangements. First, identify the number of charges in each group and their arrangement. If the arrangement of either group is not listed below, then they are not in a standard arrangement and no DC can generally be given for arrangement between the two designs.
Next, check to see if the arrangement of the first group is also listed for the number of charges in the second group. Also check to see if the arrangement of the second group is also listed for the number of charges in the first group. If the answer is yes for both, then the arrangements are comparable and there is a DC between them for change to arrangement. If the answer is no to either one (or to both), the change to arrangement is forced and there is no DC between them.
List of Standard Arrangements by Number of Charges in a Group:
  • For groups with one charge: in chief, in canton, in sinister chief, central, in base
  • For groups with two charges: in pale, in fess (whether respectant, facing the same way, or addorsed), in (fess in) chief, in bend, in bend sinister, crossed in saltire
  • For groups with three charges: two and one, one and two, in pale, in fess, in (fess in) chief, in bend, in bend sinister, in annulo
  • For groups with four or more charges: in cross, in saltire, in pale, in fess, in (fess in) chief, in bend, in bend sinister, semy, in annulo, an orle of charges
http://heraldry.sca.org/sena.html#AppendixK